Maryville

The Human Side of Immigration

The Human Side of Immigration

It’s 8 a.m. in Nogales, Arizona, as 19-year-old Maryvillian Kirksey Dalen Croft [Bonner Scholar from Maryville College] loads the back of a vehicle with supplies for an all-day mission.

She and some others head out for the scorching desert to make water drops for migrants who might be trying to make their way from Mexico and into the United States. On some nights, they camp in the desert. She doesn’t meet any travelers on this trek, but evidence of their presence is starkly evident. As they walk along one of the trails used by the migrants, crosses and memorials come into plain view.

“We’re walking in the middle of nowhere in the desert and all of a sudden, there are six crosses right there,” she said by phone Thursday. “Seeing them became normal even though this is so not normal.”

Read full story here in the Blount County newspaper The Daily Times, by Melanie Tucker Jul 11, 2019

Maryville Bonner Makes a Difference Among Special-Needs Adults

Maryville Bonner Makes a Difference Among Special-Needs Adults

At first, Elizabeth Dunn wondered how in the world she could fit community service into her college schedule.

Now she wonders how in the world she could have ignored her volunteer spirit.

Dunn, a first-year student at Maryville College, is a Bonner Scholar. In exchange for scholarship dollars, she volunteers at least 40 hours monthly at the Gateway to Independence, a local non-profit agency whose mission is to help young adults with disabilities to achieve independence by providing them with vocational training and social activities.

Maryville Bonner Starts Food Recovery Network Chapter

Maryville Bonner Starts Food Recovery Network Chapter

When Maryville College senior Brandon Denney ’16 began volunteering at local service sites, food became his focus.

As a Bonner Scholar, Denney spends 10 hours a week volunteering at local non-profits. Through his volunteer work, he witnessed food waste firsthand at various jobs and volunteer sites.

While volunteering at a local afterschool program, he also noticed that students in the program had access to healthy and nutritious food that many similar programs were unable to provide.

Alumni Profile: Peter Coats

Alumni Profile: Peter Coats

"The Bonner Scholars program not only showed me the world, it changed the way I see it. Bonner Scholars who complete their service hours during the school year receive a stipend to cover travel and living expenses on an international service trip of their choice each summer. I was able to study and complete my volunteer work in Mexico, Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Dubai, China, and India."

Bonner Scholar Lives out Boy Scout Slogan

Bonner Scholar Lives out Boy Scout Slogan

oseph "Joey" Courtney exudes a volunteer spirit as he heeds the call to serve in the Boy Scouts of America, living out the Boy Scout slogan "Do a good turn daily."

Courtney, a 19-year-old sophomore at Maryville College, hails from Knoxville, Tenn. He is a Bonner Scholar who volunteers at least 40 hours per month in exchange for scholarship monies to apply toward tuition and books.

Internships Benefit United Way, Local Latino Community, and Maryville Students

Internships Benefit United Way, Local Latino Community, and Maryville Students

Maryville College juniors Jose Perez ‘15 and Owen Shelnutt ‘15 completed summer internships at the United Way of Blount County that provided valuable work for the non-profit while providing relevant, real-world experience for the students.

Both Perez and Shelnutt completed the internship as a part of their Bonner Scholarship summer service requirements.

Perez, a psychology major with minors in sociology and Spanish, was able to provide the United Way of Blount County with important information that will help with future outreach efforts for the local Latino community.

During his internship, Perez worked on translating the United Way's needs assessment survey into Spanish, delivering it to many local businesses. He also hosted several community conversations to get a deeper understanding of the aspirations and needs of the Latino population of Blount County.

Bonner Alumnus and Wife Start Charitable Business

Bonner Alumnus and Wife Start Charitable Business

Residents of Maryville and Alcoa can now help local charities while receiving a low-cost grocery delivery service.

Maryville College alumnus Trey Brewer and wife Brett recently created a grocery delivery service, “In the Bag Delivers,” to fulfill their passion to help their community and local nonprofit organizations.

“I grew up in Maryville and benefited from the overwhelming support of parents, teachers, coaches and the general community. Now that I have graduated from Maryville College, I want to do my part to make the community a better place for the future,” said Trey on the business' official website.

Padilla Selected for THEC Service Award

Padilla Selected for THEC Service Award

Stacey Padilla, a 2015 graduate of Maryville College, is among five college students in Tennessee to be named recipient of the 2015 Harold Love Outstanding Community Service Award sponsored by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

Named for the late state representative from Nashville who was instrumental in passing legislation for community service recognition programs for higher education in 1991, the award recognizes outstanding community service at the campus level and carries a $1,000 cash prize.

Perez Leaves Lasting Impact on Campus Community

Perez Leaves Lasting Impact on Campus Community

Maryville College senior José Perez has transformed from a terrified freshman unsure of his place at Maryville College into a social justice advocate who has made a lasting impact on the MC community.

Perez, who will graduate with a bachelor’s degree on May 17, is a first-generation college student and a Mexican-American from an immigrant family.