University of Richmond

Twelve Bonners Named 2019-20 Newman Civic Fellows

Twelve Bonners Named 2019-20 Newman Civic Fellows

The Newman Civic Fellowship recognizes and supports community-committed students who are changemakers and public problem-solvers at Campus Compact member institutions. Fellows are nominated by their president or chancellor on the basis of their potential for public leadership.

Through the fellowship, Campus Compact provides students with training and resources that nurture their assets and passions and help them develop strategies for social change. The yearlong program, named for Campus Compact founder Frank Newman, includes virtual learning opportunities and networking as part of a national network of engaged student leaders and an optional in-person convening.

Students Making Change: Bonner Alicia Jiggetts on Compact Nation Podcast

Students Making Change: Bonner Alicia Jiggetts on Compact Nation Podcast

Alicia Jiggetts, a 2019 Bonner Scholar at the University of Richmond, was interviewed in this episode of the Compact Nation Podcast, along with Veronica Fernandez-Diaz.

Alicia and Veronica are two Campus Compact Newman Civic Fellows who were visiting the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the US Senate in Boston as part of the annual convening of Newman Civic Fellows.

Senior Bonner Raises Awareness for Youth Justice Reforms

Senior Bonner Raises Awareness for Youth Justice Reforms

Benedict Roemer, ’19, is passionate about affecting social change. So when the opportunity to raise awareness for issues like mass incarceration and the racial wealth gap as an intern at Campaign for Youth Justice opened up, Roemer went for it.

Roemer, a double major in leadership studies and philosophy, politics, economics, and law, first encountered Campaign for Youth Justice at the Active Citizens Conference, which he attended as part of the Bonner Scholars Sophomore Exchange Program. After the conference, he stayed in touch with the organization through weekly emails and continued to engage with youth justice through the nonprofit ART 180, which provides arts programming for Richmond youth in juvenile detention.

16 Bonners Named Newman Civic Fellows

16 Bonners Named Newman Civic Fellows

Bonners from 16 campuses in our national network were among those who received the 2018 Newman Civic Fellows Award from the Campus Compact.

Graduate is Honored with Alumni Recognition Award

Graduate is Honored with Alumni Recognition Award

Acceptance, diversity and inclusion are more than just nice words for Jonathan Zur, ’03. They are the ideas around which he orients his life.

As president and chief executive officer of the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC), a nonprofit organization that works with schools, business and communities to promote inclusion, he works throughout the state to help people and groups “value and respect diversity.”

Football Player Encourages Richmond Kids to Pursue Athletic and Academic Aspirations

Football Player Encourages Richmond Kids to Pursue Athletic and Academic Aspirations

George Boston, ′13, isn’t the first person many would have expected to play for a Division I football team.

When he started high school in New York City, he couldn't play football because the school only had a track team. In fact, the school didn’t have a lot of things. Boston knew if he wanted to attend college, he was going to have to make some changes.

Graduate Putting Leadership and Public Speaking Skills to Work in Cambodia

Graduate Putting Leadership and Public Speaking Skills to Work in Cambodia

You are headed to Cambodia to volunteer with the Peace Corps. What will you be doing?

I’ll be a community health education volunteer, which entails living with a host family in a rural village somewhere in Cambodia and working in the local community health center. My other main responsibility will be biking to nearby communities to deliver presentations in Khmer, the local language, on healthy living while focusing primarily on maternal health and disease prevention.

Junior Takes a Number of Paths to Explore Education Reform

Junior Takes a Number of Paths to Explore Education Reform

When Sharon Lim, ’16, talks about the many ways she’s exploring education inequality, it’s hard to believe that just two years ago, she had no idea her college experience would be dedicated to the issue.

She has always been an active volunteer. She spent her free time in high school working at a local hospital and teaching children to read. Her work inspired an interest in social justice so when she applied to Richmond, she also applied to the Bonner Scholars program.

Student Explores Identity Theory Through Community Work

Student Explores Identity Theory Through Community Work

Kelsey Ensign, ’15, remembers the exact moment she decided to transfer to University of Richmond. Following a conversation with Bonner Scholar Emily Blevins, ’13, who attended Ensign’s Chattanooga, Tenn., high school, Ensign logged into her computer to learn more about the work Blevins was doing through the University of Richmond’s Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE).

“I vividly remember sitting in my dorm room exploring the CCE home page,” Ensign says. “I looked at all the community partners and thought I could learn a lot about civic engagement and myself at University of Richmond.”

Commitment to Service Stays with Jepson Alumnus Long After College

Commitment to Service Stays with Jepson Alumnus Long After College

Eric Van Der Hyde, ’08, first saw the Jepson School of Leadership Studies as an eighth grader. A small town native, Van Der Hyde had grown up on a dairy farm in rural Virginia, an upbringing that instilled him with not only a strong work ethic but also a desire to do something different. He visited his aunt and uncle in Richmond to learn more about what it took to get into a good college, and on that trip, he saw the University of Richmond.

Partnering with Local Organizations Shifts Senior's Perspective from Global to Local

Partnering with Local Organizations Shifts Senior's Perspective from Global to Local

Four years ago, when Regina Cavada, ’16, left San Diego for Richmond and began her freshman year at the University of Richmond, her path seemed obvious.

“I was really interested in international issues,” she says, “I knew that was where I wanted to be.”

Cavada naturally chose an international studies major and spent her freshman year studying Arabic. She complemented her interests by partnering with World Pediatric Project as a Bonner Scholar — a program that pairs students with local organizations for four years of sustained community engagement and social justice education.

Scholar Connects the South's Racially Charged History with Service and Coursework

Scholar Connects the South's Racially Charged History with Service and Coursework

When I applied to the University of Richmond, I asked Gil Villanueva in the Office of Admissions what one piece of advice he would offer an incoming Spider. What hadn’t students taken advantage of that they should have? He replied without hesitation: “Take advantage of the city.”

It didn’t take much convincing. Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy, has historic truths in its veins; provocative stories echo through the halls of museums and on battlefields where the North and South fought, brother against brother. As a lover of American history and political science, I was hooked.

Bonner Scholar Reflects on the Power and Importance of Listening to Others' Stories

Bonner Scholar Reflects on the Power and Importance of Listening to Others' Stories

In a written reflection from the beginning of my senior year, I began describing a person whom I know through service by using an excerpt from the first chapter of Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben’s “Remnants of Auschwitz,” which I read for a French class the year before.

The chapter is entitled “The Witness,” and in this excerpt, Agamben quotes an interview with Primo Levi – a Jewish Italian chemist, writer, and Holocaust survivor. In the excerpt, Levi talks about himself in direct comparison to the classic trope of the sailor who must tell everyone his tale:

"Human Strength" is Motivating Factor for Bonner Scholar and Lacrosse Player

"Human Strength" is Motivating Factor for Bonner Scholar and Lacrosse Player

In nearly four years as a Spider, Russell Gong, ’11, has never looked back on his decision to pass up offers to play Division I lacrosse and instead attend the University of Richmond. With his record of leadership and civic engagement on campus — plus a consulting job waiting for him after graduation — why would he?

Gong, who grew up in Singapore and Fairfax, Va., was a regional lacrosse standout and was captain of his high school’s varsity lacrosse and football teams. But athletics captured only part of his attention; ever since a summer restaurant job washing dishes, he has wanted to work with refugees and immigrants.

“In the kitchen, I witnessed traumatic abuses against Mexican immigrant workers,” he says. “From there, I focused my college efforts toward social justice and community inclusion issues.”

Deconstructing Service: Bonner Reflects on his Four Years of Community Service

Deconstructing Service: Bonner Reflects on his Four Years of Community Service

Good afternoon.

For those of you who don't know me very well, I'm Sean Hickey, a senior intern for the Bonner Scholars Program. Before becoming a senior intern, I volunteered at Henderson Middle School as an after-school program leader with the Middle School Renaissance (MSR) program.

My time there caused me to ask many questions of myself, of the public school system, and of volunteering/service writ large. These questions were almost always stimulated by theoretical concepts I studied in courses taken here at UR.

The most grandiose of these questions was, if what we do today is later found to have a bad result, even though we think of our actions and service as good, than have we been doing bad things all along? Does this then mean we should always assume that our service is inherently bad or wrong in order to critically and constantly question our service and ourselves?

Richmond Student Exemplifies Servant Leadership Through Her Work with Children and Education

Richmond Student Exemplifies Servant Leadership Through Her Work with Children and Education

The Bonner Scholars Program and the Jepson School of Leadership Studies sold Colleen Connolly, '14, on the University of Richmond when she visited campus as a high school student. Now Connolly is combining a double major in leadership studies and political science with her Bonner Scholars service in order to study children in educational settings from many different perspectives. In the process, she has learned not only how to serve, but how to lead.

Richmond Student Works with City Government on Poverty Issues

Richmond Student Works with City Government on Poverty Issues

Kevin Wilson, ’13, embraces political and government service as a means of working for the betterment of society.

During his senior year in high school, the Franklinville, N.J., native served as an advisor to President Barack Obama’s election campaign and as a member of Obama’s transition team. Following his high school graduation, he worked as a summer consultant for the Domestic Policy Council, which oversees the development and implementation of the president’s domestic-policy agenda.

 

Voice of America Internship Helps Shape Student's Future in Human Rights Law

Voice of America Internship Helps Shape Student's Future in Human Rights Law


It took exactly two weeks for Voice of America to hook Diane Gremillion. She interned for a short stint just before her first year at Richmond.

Her time at the country’s official external broadcast institution was typically hectic: She helped plan journalist training for coverage of an H1N1 outbreak in Hong Kong. There was famine in Somalia. And she was also asked to interview the second lady, Dr. Jill Biden.

"I immediately wanted to go back to that experience," Gremillion says. "International journalism and human rights fascinated me."

Bonner Scholar Espouses Political Engagement as Key to a Healthy Democratic Society

Bonner Scholar Espouses Political Engagement as Key to a Healthy Democratic Society

Students listened to election returns and debated the pros and cons of Democratic and Republican candidates during the on-campus Super Tuesday viewing party on March 1, 2016. Sporting an “I voted” sticker, Brenden Carol, ’17, moved among them, pleased with the turnout for an event he organized in his role as a student coordinator of politics and elections for the Bonner Center for Civic Engagement (CCE).

“Trump dominated students’ discussion during the viewing party,” Carol said. “None of the students in either political party was happy about his front-runner status.”

Despite the prevailing angst, Carol delighted in seeing students take an interest in politics. He hopes to increase political activism on campus.